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Endotracheal Tube, Cuffed

Disposable Reinforced Silicone Laryngeal Mask

Disposable Reinforced Silicone Laryngeal Mask

There are a variety of disposable laryngeal mask options on the market. But what sets the reinforced silicone laryngeal mask apart from the others? In this article, we'll take a closer look at this type of laryngeal mask and how it can benefit patients and healthcare providers alike.

Description
  • Soft, flexible tube with spiral reinforced wire reducing risk of kinking.
  • Designed for ENT, dental, oro-maxillary and eye surgery.
Ref. No.: Size: Applicable people Qty. Cs:
NMR104229 1.0 <5kg 10
NMR104230 1.5 5-10kg 10
NMR104231 2.0 10-20kg 10
NMR104232 2.5 20-30kg 10
NMR104233 3.0 30-50kg 10
NMR104234 4.0 50-70kg 10
NMR104235 5.0 >70kg 10

Disposable Reinforced Silicone Laryngeal Mask

There are a variety of disposable laryngeal mask options on the market. But what sets the reinforced silicone laryngeal mask apart from the others? In this article, we'll take a closer look at this type of laryngeal mask and how it can benefit patients and healthcare providers alike.

What is a Disposable Reinforced Silicone Laryngeal Mask?

A Disposable Reinforced Silicone Laryngeal Mask (RLSM) is a type of silicone laryngeal mask that is designed for single use. The reinforcing layer makes the RLSM more resistant to tearing and kinking than a traditional silicone laryngeal mask. The RLSM is available in sizes 1, 2, 3, and 4, and each size has a different color-coded cuff to help identify the proper size. The RLSM has a reinforced tube that is connected to the mask cuff and has an inflation valve to allow for easy inflation of the cuff.

How does it work?

The Disposable Reinforced Silicone Laryngeal Mask is a type of masks used by medical professionals during certain medical procedures. The mask is inserted into the patient's throat and then inflated, which allows the medical professional to access the patient's airway. The mask is then removed and disposed of after the procedure is completed.

What are the benefits of using a Disposable Reinforced Silicone Laryngeal Mask?

There are many benefits of using a Disposable Reinforced Silicone Laryngeal Mask, including:

1. They provide a good seal around the larynx, preventing air from leaking out and preventing aspiration of fluids into the lungs.
2. They are easy to insert and remove, and can be done so without causing any damage to the larynx or surrounding tissues.
3. They are comfortable to wear and allow the patient to breathe normally while in place.
4. They are available in a variety of sizes to fit different patients, and can be disposable or reusable.
5. They are typically cheaper than other types of laryngeal masks, making them a more affordable option for many patients.

How to use a Disposable Reinforced Silicone Laryngeal Mask?

A disposable reinforced silicone laryngeal mask is a medical device that is used to provide ventilation and access to the airway in situations where a patient's airway is blocked or obstructed. The device consists of a mask, a connecting tube, and an inflatable cuff. The mask is placed over the patient's nose and mouth, and the cuff is inflated to create a seal around the patient's larynx. The connecting tube is then attached to a ventilator or other breathing machine.

To use the disposable reinforced silicone laryngeal mask, the medical professional will first lubricate the inside of the mask with a water-soluble gel. The gel helps to create a seal between the patient's face and the mask, and also prevents the mask from sticking to the skin. Next, the medical professional will insert the tip of the mask into the patient's mouth and then carefully guide it over the tongue and down into the pharynx. Once the mask is in place, the cuff will be inflated with air until it forms a tight seal around the larynx. The medical professional will then attach the connecting tube to the ventilator or other breathing machine.

Once everything is in place,

Are there any risks associated with using a Disposable Reinforced Silicone Laryngeal Mask?

There are no real risks associated with using a Disposable Reinforced Silicone Laryngeal Mask, as long as you follow the directions for use. However, if you have any allergies or sensitivities to silicone, you may want to avoid using this type of mask.

Disposable Reinforced Silicone Laryngeal Mask is available at low prices in Nexgen Medical online store with multiple features, Soft, flexible tube with spiral reinforced wire reducing risk of kinking, Designed for ENT, dental, oro-maxillary, and eye surgery. Endotracheal Tube, Cuffed Single-use laryngeal face mask with 100% silicone cuff and PVC tube • Silicone cuff stays soft and flexible at any temperature while remaining resistant to punctures and tearing • Anatomically correct cuff tip for proper fit and seal • Non fenestrated for easier insertion of diagnostic tools • All sizes available; neonate through large adult • Easy to identify size with color-coded packaging • MRI compatible • Latex and DEHP free Parker’s disposable silicone Laryngeal Mask Device is gentle to the airway. The smooth contouring of our 100% medical-grade silicone device enables easy insertion and is designed to produce an effective seal. The unique color-coded and printed pilot balloon allows for fast and correct size identification. We offer both standard and wire reinforced sizes 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, 3.0, 4.0, and 5.0. Supraglottic airway (SGA) devices are commonly used adjuncts to secure the airway during anesthesia or resuscitation and are an integral part of difficult airway algorithms for either elective or rescue use. Commonly used SGAs such as classic or proseal LMA are not ideal intubation aids as the airway conduit is either too narrow to accommodate an adult diameter endotracheal tube (ETT) or too long for the tracheal tube to reach the trachea. Additionally, CLMA is not sufficiently rigid to align the LMA with the glottic inlet . The Intubating Laryngeal Mask Airway (ILMA) was introduced in 1997 for clinical use and is currently the “gold standard” for tracheal intubation through SGA either blindly or by fiberscope guidance I-Gel is an SGA with a noninflatable cuff made of medical-grade thermoplastic called Styrene Ethylene Butadiene Styrene (SEBS). The device is known to be easier to insert [89], by segregating the laryngeal opening from the oropharyngeal orifice allowing better support of the perilaryngeal structures. It results in higher sealing pressures by matching the peripharyngeal anatomy despite the absence of an inflatable cuff [10]. In a cadaveric study full glottis view was obtained in 60% of the cases soon after I-Gel insertion while some glottic opening was visible in 95% of the cases. The airway channel is situated deep inside the bowl of the cuff and along with the epiglottic rest is known to ensure fresh gas flow irrespective of the downfolding of the epiglottis. I-Gel has also been used as a conduit for endotracheal intubation in both mannequins and humans Intubation through an ILMA requires the use of a wire-reinforced flexible silicone tube (FST). The FST is proposed to have unique features best suited for its use through an SGA and include the soft molded tip, the position of the inflation balloon within the tube wall, and the low volume cuff all of which make it easier to enter the laryngeal inlet compared to conventional PVC tubes. The wire-reinforced FST is also known to emerge at a lower angle than a normal PVC tube (47°) and hence does not abut anteriorly against the larynx, cricothyroid membrane, or trachea. The reported first-pass success rate of intubation with an ILMA using the FST is in the range of 50–78.9% [1417] whereas the same using a PVC tube ranges within 78.5%–86.7% [1819]. Although FST has been used for intubation through ILMA, the success rate of intubation using FST through I-Gel has not been studied in normal airways. Since FST follows the curvature of the SGA, and I-Gel has been shown to conform well with the laryngeal inlet, we hypothesized that intubation success would be non-inferior between the two devices utilizing FST for intubation. The primary outcome measure was the first pass success rate and the secondary outcome measures were the overall success rate, adverse events, and time to insertion and intubation of the two devices.