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Endotracheal Tube, Cuffed

Guedel Airways

Guedel airways are devices that are inserted into the mouth in order to keep the airway open during anesthesia. They are named after Charles Guedel, who developed the first prototype in the early 20th century. Guedel airways come in various sizes and are made of different materials, including plastic, rubber, and metal.

Description
  • The center passage permits the passage of suction catheters to clear secretions from the back of the throat.
  • Clear plastic is conductive and color-coded for size.
  • Individually packed.
Ref. No.: mm: Size: Color code: Qty. Cs:
NMR100906 120 6 Orange 500
NMR100905 110 5 Light blue 500
NMR100904 100 4 Red 500
NMR100903 90 3 Yellow 500
NMR100902 80 2 Green 500
NMR100901 70 1 White 500
NMR100910 60 0 Black 500
NMR100920 50 00 Blue 500
NMR100930 40 000 Blue 500

Guedel Airways The center passage permits the passage of suction catheters to clear secretions from the back of the throat.

Airways are simple devices that can be used to maintain an airway during anesthesia and in some emergency situations. The Guedel airway is the most common type of airway used in these situations. It is a flexible, hollow tube that is inserted into the mouth and down the throat.

What are Guedel Airways?

Guedel airways are devices that are inserted into the mouth in order to keep the airway open during anesthesia. They are named after Charles Guedel, who developed the first prototype in the early 20th century. Guedel airways come in various sizes and are made of different materials, including plastic, rubber, and metal.

What is the center passage for?

The center passage is for the passage of suction catheters to clear secretions from the back of the throat. This is an important function, as secretions can build up and block the airway. The suction catheter helps to keep the airway clear and prevent blockages.

How do Guedel Airways work?

Guedel Airways are a type of airway device that is inserted into the mouth in order to keep the airway open. They are commonly used during surgery, but can also be used in emergency situations. The device consists of a tube that goes into the mouth and a balloon that is inflated once the tube is in place. This prevents the tongue from falling back and blocking the airway.

Who can use Guedel Airways?

Guedel Airways are most commonly used by people who have difficulty clearing secretions from the back of their throat. They can also be used by people who have trouble breathing through their nose.

How to use Guedel Airways

Guedel Airways are an essential part of any ENT (ear, nose, and throat) doctor's toolkit. They are inserted into the back of the throat in order to keep the airway open during procedures. They are also used to suction secretions from the back of the throat.

To use a Guedel airway, first lubricate the airway with water-soluble lubricant. Next, insert the airway into the back of the throat. Once in place, inflate the balloon with sterile water. The balloon should be inflated until it is snug, but not too tight. Finally, connect the suction catheter to the proximal end of the airway and begin suctioning secretions from the back of the throat.

Benefits of using Guedel Airways

Guedel Airways provides many benefits for those who use it to clear secretions from the back of the throat. Perhaps most importantly, it is much more comfortable than using a suction catheter. Additionally, Guedel Airways is less likely to cause irritation and is easier to insert.

Guedel Airways, Oral Airways, early resuscitation, & recognition of airway care
The commonplace oropharyngeal airway, often useful and sometimes essential, has had different designs and manufacturers. The most common style is Guedel’s airway, so much so that Arthur Guedel is sometimes erroneously thought to have invented rather than developed the oral airway. Guedel Airways   The earliest written invention is Hewitt’s airway: at first, a straight wide rubber tube, then curved, with a metal flange for dental and labial separation. Many followed, often metal for sterilization (but risky to teeth and tissues, if there was clenching or seizure), sometimes with nipples for gas insufflation. In fact, I recall using flangeless wire airways that required a tape-pull for withdrawal. Later developments included airways designed for mouth to airway resuscitation. We can cover that next time. Before the modern era, airway management and resuscitation had a fitful history. There are descriptions of tracheotomy in Egypt, 3600 BC, and Alexander the Great is said to have saved a soldier by opening the trachea with his sword tip. At various times, physicians would use metal tubes, catheters, or quills to bring air past the glottis, or open the trachea to admit a bellows for insufflation. These were for resuscitation with dismal but occasionally successful results, but modern understanding was lacking. Avicenna, ~1000 AD, writes upon intubation to rescue, but the first intubation for surgical anesthesia was by Macewen in 1878. Management of anesthesia via natural airway (“rag & bottle” ether or chloroform) had sudden deaths due to dosing errors, indifferent administration, and poor airway management. Reading those accounts shows a hit-and-miss proposition. What we call the Triple Airway Maneuver (neck straightening, head extension, lifting the jaw into an open-mouthed prognathic position with the lower teeth (& jaw) advanced anterior to the maxillary teeth) was a great step, probably developed in several areas at first (in different combinations) attributed to Esmarch, then Heiberg, then Little, then Clover in the 1860s. Pulling the tongue forward, perhaps with pliers, some bite-sticks, and gags had to suffice until Hewitt’s 1908 invention.  Then came more anatomic curvature, teeth-protecting bumpers, Guedel Airways gas nipples, and then Guedel’s terse description of an oval tube with metal bite guard, and flange to keep position above the lips. Things have remained so with changes in material to plastics, and other styles to avoid blockage, or to facilitate intubation.