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Endotracheal Tube, Cuffed

TTU Tracheostomy Tube Uncuffed

The TTU tracheostomy tube is a medical device that is inserted into the trachea (windpipe) to provide an airway for patients who cannot breathe on their own. It is commonly used in patients who have had a tracheostomy, which is a surgical procedure to create an opening in the neck in order to insert the tube. The TTU tracheostomy tube is made of soft, flexible material and has a large inner diameter that allows for easy breathing. It also has a cuff that can be inflated or deflated in order to seal off the airway when needed.

Description
  • Used for patients with tracheal problems.
  • Used for patients who are ready for decannulation.
Ref. No.: Size: Qty. Cs:
NMR100831 5.0 100
NMR100836 6.5 100
NMR100841 7.0 100

TTU Tracheostomy Tube Uncuffed

The TTU tracheostomy tube is a medical device that is inserted into the trachea (windpipe) to provide an airway for patients who cannot breathe on their own. It is commonly used in patients who have had a tracheostomy, which is a surgical procedure to create an opening in the neck in order to insert the tube. The TTU tracheostomy tube is made of soft, flexible material and has a large inner diameter that allows for easy breathing. It also has a cuff that can be inflated or deflated in order to seal off the airway when needed.

What is a TTU Tracheostomy Tube?

A TTU tracheostomy tube is a type of medical device that is inserted into the trachea (windpipe) to allow breathing. The tube has a small opening at the end that goes into the trachea and a larger opening at the other end that goes outside of the body. The larger opening is covered with a cap or plug. The TTU tracheostomy tube is also known as an uncuffed tracheostomy tube.

How is a TTU Tracheostomy Tube Used?

A TTU tracheostomy tube is a type of medical device that is inserted into the trachea (windpipe) through an incision in the neck. The tube is used to maintain an airway and to allow for suctioning of secretions. It can also be used to deliver oxygen or other gases.

Who Needs a TTU Tracheostomy Tube?

A tracheostomy is a medical procedure that involves making a small incision in the neck in order to insert a tube into the windpipe. This tube is then used to help the person breathe. A TTU tracheostomy tube is an uncuffed tube that is commonly used for people who have had a tracheostomy. This type of tube is less likely to cause irritation or damage to the trachea and surrounding tissues.

Pros and Cons of TTU Tracheostomy Tubes

There are many different types of tracheostomy tubes available on the market, each with its own set of pros and cons. One type of tube that is gaining popularity is the TTU, or Tracheostomy Tube Uncuffed. This type of tube has a number of advantages over other types of tracheostomy tubes, but it also has some disadvantages that should be considered before deciding if it is the right type of tube for you or your loved one.

The biggest advantage of TTU tracheostomy tubes is that they are much less likely to cause damage to the trachea than other types of tubes. This is because the tube is not inserted all the way into the trachea, but rather just far enough to allow air to flow through. This means that there is less chance of the tube causing irritation or inflammation to the sensitive tissues lining the trachea.

Another advantage of TTU tracheostomy tubes is that they are easier to care for than other types of tubes. This is because they do not need to be replaced as often, and because they are less likely to become blocked or damaged.

The biggest disadvantage of TTU tracheostomy tubes is that they

How to Care for a TTU Tracheostomy Tube

A TTU tracheostomy tube is a type of tracheostomy tube that is used to provide an airway for patients who cannot breathe on their own. The TTU tracheostomy tube is inserted through a small incision in the neck and into the trachea (windpipe). The TTU tracheostomy tube has a cuff that helps to keep the airway open and prevents air from leak around the tube. There are several different types of TTU tracheostomy tubes available, and your doctor will choose the type that is best for you.

The care of a TTU tracheostomy tube is similar to the care of any other type of tracheostomy tube. It is important to keep the area around the tube clean and free from infection. TheTTU tracheostomy tube should be checked regularly to make sure that it is secure and that there are no leaks. The cuff should be inflated as needed to maintain an airtight seal. If you have any questions about the care of your TTU tracheostomy tube, please contact your doctor or healthcare team.

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TTU Tracheostomy Tube Uncuffed

TTU Tracheostomy Tube Uncuffed Acquired nonmalignant TEF in adults is very rare. The most common etiology is intubation with cuff-related tracheal injury. Our patient did not have any TEF before the EGD procedure during the PEG tube placement, and this is the probable cause of her fistula formation.  Potential risk factors which could increase the risk for the TEF formation are her history of tracheostomy on the previous day, endotracheal intubation injury, increased cuff pressure in the endotracheal and the tracheostomy tube, her history of current steroid use, and diabetes. Some of these risk factors could cause TEF independently. The incidence of esophageal perforation during upper endoscopy is estimated at 0.03% and 0.11% during rigid endoscopy The most common sites of iatrogenic esophageal perforation are at the normal anatomic narrowing in the hypopharynx or the cervical esophageal secondary to force exerted in attempting to pass the endoscope through the cricopharynx. It is most commonly associated with upper endoscopy interventions, such as esophageal dilation, high inflation pressure, previous laser or sclerotherapy, and history of esophageal cancer. Iatrogenic esophageal perforation during transesophageal echocardiography is a well-known cause of esophageal perforation and occurs with an incidence of 0.18% In 1972 Hugh Harley reported 44 cases of TEF associated with a tracheostomy with the estimated incidence to be 1 in 200. Jugn et al. reported a case of TEF through esophageal diverticulum in a patient who had a prolonged tracheostomy tube.7 Other documented causes are tracheostomy, lung transplantation, thyroid resection, thoracic aneurysm repair, esophageal leiomyoma enucleation, mediastinoscopy, and cervical spine surgery. Common presentations include cough, recurrent pneumonia, increased secretions, and evidence of gastric aspiration into the trachea while on the ventilator.1 The cuff can completely occlude the fistula which might cause atypical presentations with less cough and fewer secretions. A high index of suspicion is very important in patients who have undergone procedures or have prolonged ventilator support with tracheostomy tubes. Bronchoscopy and esophagoscopy can help in the diagnosis of TEF.1 Immediate treatment includes placement of the cuff beyond the fistula to prevent more aspiration. Spontaneous closure is very rare, and surgical closure is usually indicated in most patients.  Surgery should be postponed till the patient is weaned from the mechanical ventilation because high positive pressure ventilation can increase the chances of dehiscence, the persistence of the fistula, and stenosis. Malignant TEF has a poor prognosis, and esophageal bypass and stenting are commonly used to treat malignant TEF.

References

  1. Reed MF, Mathisen DJ. Tracheoesophageal fistula. https://www.facebook.com/nexgenmed Chest Surg Clin N Am 2003 May; 13(2):271-89.
  2. Wu JT, Mattox KL, Wall MJ. Esophageal perforations: new perspectives and treatment paradigms.  J Trauma 2007;63:1173–1184
  3. Gama AH, Waye JD. Complications and hazards of gastrointestinal endoscopy. World J Surg 1989;13:193–201
  4. Silvis SE, Nebel O, Rogers G, et al. Results of the 1974 American Society for gastrointestinal endoscopy survey. JAMA 1976; 235:928–930.
  5. Daniel WG, Erbel R, Kasper W, et al. Safety of transesophageal echocardiography. A multicenter survey of 10,419 examinations. Circulation 1991;83:817– 821
  6. Salmon F. Tracheostomy.  Proc R Soc Med 1975 June; 68(6): 347–356.
  7. Jung JH, Kim JS, Kim YK. Acquired Tracheoesophageal Fistula through Esophageal Diverticulum in Patient Who Had a Prolonged Tracheostomy Tube - A Case Report. Ann Rehabil Med 2011 June; 35(3): 436–440.
  8. Williamson WA, Ellis FH. Esophageal perforation. In: Taylor MB, Gollan JL, Steer ML, Wolfe MM, eds. Gastrointestinal Emergencies. TTU Tracheostomy Tube Uncuffed 2nd ed. Baltimore, MD: Williams & Wilkins; 1997:31–35.