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Infusion Extension Line

Infusion Extension Line

To understand the use of a 2-way infusion extension line, it is important to first understand how it is used. The 2-way infusion extension line is typically connected to a syringe pump and then placed into the patient's IV port. This connects the pump hose to the patient's IV tubing so that the medicines can be injected into the bloodstream at a controlled rate.

Description
Ref. No.: ID.: Length:
NMH040304 3.0 mm 1.5m
NMH040308 1.7 mm 1.5m

Introduction to 2-way Infusion Extension Lines

A 2-way infusion extension line is a medical device that is used to connect an IV catheter to a source of fluid. The extension line allows the IV fluid to be infused into the patient at a controlled rate. The extension line also allows for the withdrawal of blood or other fluids from the patient. 2-way infusion extension lines are made from a variety of materials, including polyurethane, polyethylene, and PVC. The material selected for the extension line depends on the intended use of the device. For example, polyurethane is often used for devices that will be used for long-term infusion, while PVC is often used for devices that will be used for short-term infusion. 2-way infusion extension lines typically have two ports: a proximal port and a distal port. The proximal port is connected to the IV catheter, while the distal port is connected to the source of fluid. The proximal port has a valve that controls the flow of fluid into the patient. The distal port has a valve that controls the flow of fluid out of the patient. 2-way infusion extension lines are available in a variety of lengths. The length of the extension line should be selected based on the needs of the patient. For example, shorter extension lines may be used for patients who are able to move around easily, while longer extension lines may be needed for patients who are bedridden.

What is an Extension Line?

An infusion extension line is a medical device that is used to connect an intravenous (IV) catheter to a primary infusion line. Extension lines are available in a variety of lengths and sizes, and are typically made of flexible, non-reactive materials such as polyurethane or polyvinyl chloride. Infusion extension lines are sterile, single-use devices that are typically disposable after a single use. Extension lines are used when it is necessary to extend the length of an IV catheter beyond its initial placement site. They may also be used to connect two IV catheters together, or to connect an IV catheter to a secondary infusion line. Extension lines typically have male Luer-lock connectors on each end, which allow them to be securely attached to other medical devices. Most extension lines also have an internal valve that helps to prevent backflow of fluids.

How does an extension line work?

An extension line is a tube that connects an infusion pump to a catheter. It is used to infuse medications, fluids, or nutrients into the body. The extension line allows the pump to be placed in a convenient location, such as on a belt or in a pocket, and the catheter can be placed at the infusion site.

What are the benefits of using a 2-way infusion extension line?

If you are receiving intravenous (IV) therapy, chances are you will need to use an extension line. An extension line is a length of tubing that connects the primary IV line to the patient's vein. There are many different types of extension lines available, but the 2-way infusion extension line is one of the most commonly used. The 2-way infusion extension line has many benefits over other types of extension lines. One benefit is that it allows for more flexibility in IV placement. With a 2-way infusion extension line, the IV can be placed in any vein, regardless of its location. This is especially helpful for patients who have difficult veins or those who require multiple IVs. Another benefit of the 2-way infusion extension line is that it can be used with any type of catheter. This means that you can use the same extension line for both your primary and secondary IVs. This is extremely helpful if you need to receive IV therapy on a regular basis or if you have multiple sclerosis and require daily treatments. Finally, the 2-way infusion extension line is much easier to use than other types of extension lines. It is simple to connect and disconnect, and there is no need for special adapters or clamps. This makes it an ideal choice for both home care and hospital settings.

Types of 2-way Infusion Extension Lines

A 2-way infusion extension line is a type of medical device that is used to connect an IV catheter to a source of infusate. The extension line allows for the infusion of fluids into the patient's body and also allows for the withdrawal of blood or other fluids from the patient. There are two types of 2-way infusion extension lines: those with a luer lock connection and those with a Luer slip connection. The luer lock connection is the most common type of connection and is used with all types of IV catheters. The Luer slip connection is less common and is typically only used with certain types of IV catheters, such as those used for hemodialysis. 2-way infusion extension lines are available in various lengths, depending on the needs of the patient. They are also available in different sizes, which are determined by the inner diameter of the tubing. The most common size is 14 gauge, but other sizes are available as well. 2-way infusion extension lines are typically made from medical grade PVC or polyurethane and are sterile when they are packaged. They can be used with all types of IV solutions, including saline, dextrose, and lipid emulsions.

BACKGROUND of INFUSION EXTENSION LINE: For anesthesia or conscious sedation of patients undergoing diagnostic or therapeutic procedures in computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging scans, an extension of infusion lines for continuous drug delivery of anesthetics or vasopressors is often necessary. In this study, we tried to determine if the length of the Infusion Extension Line influenced the time until an alarm sounded after occlusion at the end of the infusion line. METHODS: We connected 2 infusion pump systems of the same model with 1, 2 or 3 infusion lines in series or with a spiral nonkinking low compliance infusion line, and started the infusion for 60 s. The end of the infusion line was then occluded by turning a stopcock to occlude the fluid flow. A pressure sensor was connected to the infusion line to record the actual pressure change in the line. The time until the pressure occlusion alarm sounded was measured 5 consecutive times at flow rates of 5, 20, and 50 mL/h. RESULTS: When using a single infusion line, pressure occlusion alarms were triggered after 2.4 ± 0.1 min for infusion pump 1 and 2.6 ± 0.2 min for infusion pump 2 at 50 mL/h, after 6.6 ± 0.4 min and 5.6 ± 0.5 min at 20 mL/h, and after 23.0 ± 2.8 min and 20.9 ± 3.6 min at 5 mL/h, respectively. When adding a second infusion line, a pressure occlusion alarm was triggered after 27.1 ± 1.8 min for infusion pump 1 (P = 0.1) and after 29.2 ± 1.4 min for infusion pump 2 (P = 0.07) at 5 mL/h. With 3 infusion lines, the pressure occlusion alarm of infusion pumps 1 and 2 were significantly prolonged when compared with 1 infusion line and were released at 31.6 ± 3.0 min (P = 0.01) and 35.1 ± 1.1 min (P = 0.001) at 5 mL/h, respectively. The pressure level triggering an alarm ranged in both infusion pumps between about 900 and 1100 Mbar. CONCLUSIONS: When simulating low flow rate infusions (5 mL/h) as for vasopressor support, occlusion alarm time was critically prolonged, especially with an increased length of infusion lines.
IMPLICATIONS: By increasing the length of infusion lines, the time until an infusion pump triggered a pressure occlusion alarm was critically prolonged, especially at low infusion rates, as is often used for vasopressor support of unstable patients.

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Infusion Extension Line