Show All Category
Endotracheal Tube, Cuffed

Urinary Drain Bag – NMU210703

A urine meter drain bag is a small bag made of cloth or plastic that is used to catch urine that has been drained from a urinary catheter. The urine meter drain bag is inserted into the urethra before the catheter is removed and held in place by the natural flow of urine.

Description
  • With anti-reflux device(three parts), with needle or needleless sample port.
  • With bed sheet clamp.
  • ·With reinforced double hanger and rope hanger, With T valve.
  • Latex-free, Packed sterile.
  • Four different types of sample port are available
  • Front film is transparent, back film is white.
  • Four types of outlet (T- valve, Twist valve, pull-push valve, single reversal valve.)
  • ·Six types of sample port, (NMU-P029, P030, P031, P032, P042, P043)
  • With anti-reflux valve.
  • ·Latex-free, packed sterile.
  • ·W/or W/O plastic tie or double ropes.
Ref. No.: Capacity: Qty.Cs:
NMU210701 2600ml 40
NMU210702 2500ml 40
NMU210703 2000ml
NMU210706 4000ml 20

Urine Meter Drain Bag

Do you have a large mess to clean up? In most cases, cleaning up a large mess can be quite a hassle. But with a urine meter drain bag, the cleanup process is made much simpler. All you need to do is place the bag over the urine meter and wait for the water to flow through it, which will pick up all the urine and debris.

What is a urine meter drain bag?

A urine meter drain bag is a small bag made of cloth or plastic that is used to catch urine that has been drained from a urinary catheter. The urine meter drain bag is inserted into the urethra before the catheter is removed and held in place by the natural flow of urine.

How to use a urine meter drain bag

Building a urine meter drain bag is an easy way to quickly and easily drain your urine meter. Here are instructions on how to make a urine meter drain bag:

1. Cut a large hole in the bottom of a trash bag.
2. Put the bag over the end of the urine meter.
3. Tie the opening of the bag around the middle with a knot, making sure that it is tight enough so that the water cannot escape.
4. Hang the bag from a hook or some other convenient location so that it can drip freely into the waste disposal unit below.
5. Wait until your urine meter is full, and then tie off the bottom of the bag and dispose of it as normal garbage.

What to do in the event of a flood or leak

If you're in a situation where you have to evacuate your home due to a flood or leak, it's important to know what to do in the event of an emergency. Here are a few tips on how to handle a urine meter drain bag if something goes wrong:

1. If you have a urine meter that's connected to a drainage system, disconnect the drain line from the meter before evacuating. This will prevent any potential flooding from the drainage system and also minimize the chance of backflow into your home.

2. If you don't have a urine meter connected to a drainage system, place newspapers around the area where the leak is occurring and cover any exposed surfaces with a plastic sheeting or tarp. This will help absorb any water that leaks and prevent damage to furniture or other objects.

3. Once you've evacuated your home, place all valuable items in sealed containers and place them outside in a safe location. Make sure to label each container with its contents so that you can locate them quickly once you return home.

4. If possible, disconnect all appliances, including water heaters, before leaving your home. This will help keep them from turning on in an uncontrolled

Urinary drain bag is associated with a number of complications including catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI), tissue damage, bypassing, and blockage. The risk of complications means catheters should only be used after considering other continence management options and should be removed as soon as clinically appropriate (Loveday et al, 2014). Urinary Drain Bag During the insertion procedure tissue trauma and poor aseptic technique can lead to CAUTI; this risk continues for as long as the catheter is in place. Risk factors for CAUTI are outlined in Box 1. Appropriate catheter drainage and support devices, as well as hand hygiene and associated infection prevention strategies, can reduce the risk of CAUTI. Catheterization can have a profound effect on patients’ lifestyle and sexual relationships (Prinjha and Chapple, 2013; Royal College of Nursing, 2012) so it is vital that patients are involved in the selection of drainage and support devices, urinary drain bag and that their ability to manage these independently is assessed.

Selecting a drainage system

The selection of an appropriate drainage device depends on:
  • The reason for, and likely duration of, catheterization;
  • Patient preference;
  • Infection prevention issues (Dougherty and Lister, 2015).
There are a number of catheter bag types including:
  • Two-liter bags – used for non-ambulatory patients and overnight drainage;
  • Leg bags – can be worn under clothes, thereby encouraging mobility and rehabilitation as patients do not have to carry a bag attached to a catheter stand. Leg bags can also have a positive effect on patients’ dignity as they are not visible to others (Dougherty and Lister, 2015);
  • Durometer bags – used to closely monitor urinary output.
Principles that health professionals should bear in mind when managing drainage devices are highlighted in Box 2.
An overview of catheter drainage and support systems

Abstract

This article, the third in a six-part series on urinary catheters, provides an overview of drainage devices and catheter support systems. It also explains the procedure for emptying a catheter bag.

Citation: Yates A (2017) Urinary catheters 3: catheter drainage and support systems. Nursing Times [online]; 113: 3, 41-43.

Author: Ann Yates is director of continence services, Cardiff and Vale University Health Board.
  • This article has been double-blind peer reviewed
  • Scroll down to read the article or download a print-friendly PDF here (if the PDF fails to fully download please try again using a different browser)
  • Click here to see other articles in this series

Introduction

Urinary catheterization is associated with a number of complications including catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI), tissue damage, bypassing, and blockage. The risk of complications means catheters should only be used after considering other continence management options and should be removed as soon as clinically appropriate (Loveday et al, 2014). During the insertion procedure tissue trauma and poor aseptic technique can lead to CAUTI; this risk continues for as long as the catheter is in place. Risk factors for CAUTI are outlined in Box 1. Appropriate catheter drainage and support devices, as well as hand hygiene and associated infection prevention strategies, can reduce the risk of CAUTI.

Box 1. CAUTI risk factors 

The risk of catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) is increased when:
  • The connection between the drainage device and catheter is broken
  • The drainage device’s tap becomes contaminated when the bag is being emptied or comes into contact with the floor
  • Reflux of urine from the bag into the bladder occurs because the bag is full or positioned above the level of the bladder
  • There is poor hand hygiene before the catheter is handled by the patient or carer
  • Patients have poor oral intake and/or level of personal hygiene while caring for their catheter
  • The catheter is inadequately secured, causing trauma to the urethra and bladder neck
Catheterization can have a profound effect on patients’ lifestyle and sexual relationships (Prinjha and Chapple, 2013; Royal College of Nursing, 2012) so it is vital that patients are involved in the selection of drainage and support devices, and that their ability to manage these independently is assessed.

Selecting a drainage system

The selection of an appropriate drainage device depends on:
  • The reason for, and likely duration of, catheterization;
  • Patient preference;
  • Infection prevention issues (Dougherty and Lister, 2015).
There are a number of catheter bag types including:
  • Two-liter bags – used for non-ambulatory patients and overnight drainage;
  • Leg bags – can be worn under clothes, thereby encouraging mobility and rehabilitation as patients do not have to carry a bag attached to a catheter stand. Leg bags can also have a positive effect on patients’ dignity as they are not visible to others (Dougherty and Lister, 2015);
  • Durometer bags – used to closely monitor urinary output.
Principles that health professionals should bear in mind when managing drainage devices are highlighted in Box 2.

Box 2. Principles for managing drainage devices

  • Catheters must be attached to an appropriate drainage device or catheter valve (see part 5 on catheter valves to be published in the May issue)
  • The connection between the catheter and urinary drainage system must not be broken unless clinically indicated (Loveday et al, 2014)
  • Catheter bags should be changed according to clinical need – for example, if the bag is discolored, contains sediment, smells offensive, or is damaged (Royal College of Nursing, 2012), urinary drain bag or as instructed by manufacturers (Loveday et al, 2014), which is usually every seven days (RCN, 2012)
  • Catheter specimens of urine should be obtained from a sampling port on the catheter drainage device according to local policy
  • Bags should be positioned below the level of the bladder (Loveday et al, 2014); many are fitted with an anti-reflux valve
  • Urinary drainage bags should not be allowed to fill beyond three-quarters (Loveday et al, 2014)
  • When a 2L drainage bag is used, it should be attached to an appropriate stand, and contact with the floor should be avoided (Loveday et al, 2014)
  • A separate clean container should be used to empty bags, avoiding contact between tap and container (Loveday et al, 2014)
  • Antiseptic or antimicrobial solutions should not be added to urinary drainage bags (Loveday et al, 2014)
  • Catheters must be well supported to reduce traction-related problems such as bypassing of urine, and discomfort and soreness around the catheter

Leg drainage bags

Leg bags should be connected to the catheter to create a sterile closed-drainage system (Loveday et al, 2014), and changed in line with manufacturers’ recommendations or when clinically indicated (Loveday et al, 2014). If the bag becomes disconnected from the catheter it should be replaced with a new one immediately. Leg bags come in a variety of sizes (Fig 1a) including:
  • 350ml – a small capacity bag;
  • 500ml – the most common choice for daily use;
  • 750ml.
The capacity required can be determined by the patient’s urine output. Leg bags come with three lengths of tubing (Fig 1b):
  • Direct inlet – attaches directly to the catheter;
  • Short tube;
  • Long tube.
  • urinary drain bag